‘Secularism & the Church of England: The Future For Orthodox Anglicans Committed to the Gospel and the Catholicity of the Church’. Gavin’s paper at the Oxford Anglican Patrimony conference:-

Patrimony conference porgramme.JPG

A Conference On Anglican Patrimony

On The 50th Anniversary of The Publication of  Archbishop Michael Ramsey’s ‘Gospel And The Catholic Church.

 

Secularism & the Church of England:

The Future For Orthodox Anglicans Committed to the Gospel and the Catholicity of the Church.

‘The Gospel and Catholic Church’.

 

This conference has rightly set out to look both backwards and forwards. Back to the inspiration of Ramsey’s interpretations of the symbiotic mutuality of Gospel and Catholicity, and forward to discern how Gospel and Catholicity can be faithfully expressed in a culture that has begun to turn aggressively on both Gospel and tradition.

 

My own experience of both began when I grew up in the Cathedral precincts of Canterbury when Michael Ramsey was Archbishop. It was he who confirmed us in the mother Church of the Cathedral, and he who prowled around the precincts among us, not unlike an ancient benign Patriarch, blessing shyly whatever or whoever he came across. Continue reading “‘Secularism & the Church of England: The Future For Orthodox Anglicans Committed to the Gospel and the Catholicity of the Church’. Gavin’s paper at the Oxford Anglican Patrimony conference:-“

The danger of the judiciary, the malice of the media, the perniciousness of progressive policies – and how Alfie paid the price.

The state refused to release little Alfie as he died, into the hands of his parents.

The medical issues are ones that many of us have to take on trust. Alfie is dying. The judge who presided over the parents’ last minute appeal was a Justice Anthony Hayden. Continue reading “The danger of the judiciary, the malice of the media, the perniciousness of progressive policies – and how Alfie paid the price.”

Syria and the Western Christian conscience.

Syrian Church

As people of faith we learn to be bi-focal. We look through the eyes of secular newsflashes, and we look through the eyes of spiritual and theological discernment.

So Syria has been much in the news. But to the community of faith, Syria is not just a place. It is both a birthplace, and an end-place. Theologically, for Christians it is the birth place of the Church. It is the place where in Antioch, we first became known as Christians (Acts 11.26) ; for Muslims the place at the end of time, the apocalypse. This dual identity lies at the heart of the present secular conflict and how we understand it. Continue reading “Syria and the Western Christian conscience.”

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