Cover up and abuse: Winchester, Canterbury, York, Hull, Gloucester, Jersey…., ~ in and by the Church. Corruption in the Church of England.

WATCHING a previous Archbishop of Canterbury being grilled by a QC last week was like watching a slow-motion car crash. Having your internal self-contradictions exposed by a skilful interrogator in the public gaze is the stuff nightmares are made of. Continue reading “Cover up and abuse: Winchester, Canterbury, York, Hull, Gloucester, Jersey…., ~ in and by the Church. Corruption in the Church of England.”

Winning and losing, and how sport gives the lie to ‘equality’.

“’Tis better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all”.

For Tennyson, who wrote this in his poem In Memoriam, longing and loving is what makes us truly human. There have been different kinds of longing this summer. Longing for England to win the World Cup again and bring it home. Longing for our heroes to triumph in tennis and cricket. Continue reading “Winning and losing, and how sport gives the lie to ‘equality’.”

As Robert Fisk interviews the Dr at the Douma clinic in Syria who claims the injuries were caused by dust, Gavin Ashenden questions our own Establishment’s reliance on propaganda.

Every so often something happens to you which propels you into a different world. It’s not usually a better world, and it is accompanied by a sense of shock.

Philosophers have called it a ‘disclosure moment’. We, the public, talk about ‘the penny dropping.’ They come as small pennies, and huge ones. Mine today dropped with a thud that felt ominous.

It’s about Syria and the newspapers. Continue reading “As Robert Fisk interviews the Dr at the Douma clinic in Syria who claims the injuries were caused by dust, Gavin Ashenden questions our own Establishment’s reliance on propaganda.”

The new ‘hate-laws’ require us to determine if Islam is a religion of peace; the judiciary is muddled; a comparison with Jesus helps.

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I first met Charles Haddon-Cave when I was 15. I had walked into a kettle I had left to boil on the floor, and the boiling water had burnt all the skin off around my ankle, so I was sent to the Sanatorium until it grew back. He had something infectious. We chatted a bit to while away the time, and got to know each other. Neither of us knew much about Islam at the time; or indeed Christianity. Subsequently we both ended up studying law at university, and he went on to become a judge. Continue reading “The new ‘hate-laws’ require us to determine if Islam is a religion of peace; the judiciary is muddled; a comparison with Jesus helps.”

Gay marriage and conscience clauses (published in Jersey where conscience clauses are being debated)

It has always seemed strange to me that once the gay community won their freedom to marry in civil law, as well having gained legal protection in civil partnerships, they should move onto the offensive and attack the rights of Christian clergy and churches to retain their own distinctive definition of marriage.

After all, the gay community understandably pitched their case to the rest of society saying, “look this is how we are – these are our values- please respect us and allow the law to reflect and affirm our life styles and convictions. Continue reading “Gay marriage and conscience clauses (published in Jersey where conscience clauses are being debated)”

Welby’s Will-To-Power:   Pride & Ego- Sanity & Sanctity, in the Saga of George Bell.

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The facts are on the whole well known. Lord Carlile, having been forbidden by his terms of reference to judge the innocence or guilt of poor Bishop Bell, did allow himself to tell the world that Bell would never have been found guilty in a court of law.

Peter Hitchens was almost apoplectic with surprise and frustration at Welby’s intransgence.

Continue reading “Welby’s Will-To-Power:   Pride & Ego- Sanity & Sanctity, in the Saga of George Bell.”

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